Embrace a Tradition of Royalty

African Clothes

If you are looking for high quality African Clothes, please visit our site site at http://www.african-clothes.com

They have a growing collection of beautiful African dresses and garments.

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Kente Cloth Printable Coloring Book


Print this Kente Cloth Coloring book for free courtesy of KenteCloth.net. Children will have hours of fun creating their own wonderful kente cloth!
Help us to create new books and keep this one free by donating:





Protected by Copyright. Unauthorized reproduction or redistribution is prohibited. Download Book Here.

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Kente Cloth

What is Kente? Kente is a cloth or fabric local to Ghana and nearby West African countries. It is thought that Kente Cloth was inspired by the weaving patterns of a spider as it weaves it’s web. (the spider is a famous figure in Ghanaian mythology and is referred to as Kwaku Ananse). Kente cloth is known locally as “nwentoma”. It can be made from various kinds of threads such as rayon, however it is best known to be made from silk. It is not just the colors that make Kente special, but the way the fabric is woven. Kente Cloth can come in many colors or just one solid color. If it is woven in the traditional manner then it is still referred to as Kente.

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African Art

African art varies greatly, from wooden hand carved figures to paintings to handmade fabrics like Kente Cloth and Batik cloth art.  The different countries of Africa each share similar artistic heritages and you will find that art from different areas of Africa share similar styles and qualities, although specific cultures place their own signatures on their arts. In Ghana, you will find that Kente Cloth is the signature art of the country.  However you will find other types of art such as the “Dondo” drum, which is used for community events and the more modern wax print cloth which is adorned by both women and men alike.

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Video: How Kente is Made

Documentary about how Kente Cloth is woven

Pictures of Class of 2011 Kente weaving

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Kente Cloth Adinkra Symbols & Meaning

Below are the meanings of Adinkra symbols that you may find on Kente Cloths. These are different from Kente Cloth Weave Patterns & Meaning

adinkra

ADINKRAHENE

“chief of adinkra symbols”

greatness, charisma, leadership

AKOBEN

“war horn”

vigilance, wariness

AKOFENA

“sword of war”

courage, valor

AKOKONAN

“the leg of a hen”

mercy, nurturing

AKOMA

“the heart”

patience & tolerance

AKOMA NTOSO

“linked hearts”

understanding, agreement

ANANSE NTONTAN

“spider’s web”

wisdom, creativity

ASASE YE DURU

“the Earth has weight”

divinity of Mother Earth

AYA

“fern”

endurance, resourcefulness

BESE SAKA

“sack of cola nuts”

affluence, abundance, unity

BI NKA BI

“no one should bite the other”

peace, harmony

BOA ME NA

ME MMOA WO

“help me and let me help you”

cooperation, interdependence

DAME-DAME

name of a board game

intelligence, ingenuity

DENKYEM

“crocodile”

adaptability

DUAFE

“wooden comb”

beauty, hygiene, feminine qualities

DWENNIMMEN

“ram’s horns”

humility and strength

EBAN

“fence”

love, safety, security

EPA

“handcuffs”

law, justice, slavery

ESE NE TEKREMA

“the teeth and the tongue”

friendship, interdependence

fawohodie

FAWOHODIE

“independence”

independence, freedom, emancipation

FIHANKRA

“house/compound”

security, safety

FOFO

“a yellow-flowered plant”

jealousy, envy

FUNTUNFUNEFU

DENKYEMFUNEFU

“siamese crocodiles”

democracy, unity in diversity

GYE NYAME

“except for God”

supremacy of God

HWEMUDUA

“measuring stick”

examination, quality control

HYE WONHYE

“that which cannot be burnt”

imperishability, endurance

keta pa

KETE PA

“good bed”

good marriage

kintinkantan

KINTINKANTAN

“puffed up extravagance”

arrogance, extravagance

KWATAKYE ATIKO

“hairstyle of Kwatakye, a war hero”

bravery, valor

mate masie

MATE MASIE

“what I hear, I keep”

wisdom, knowledge, prudence

me ware wo

ME WARE WO

“I shall marry you”

commitment, perseverance

mframadan

MFRAMADAN

“wind-resistant house”

fortitude, preparedness

MMERE DANE

“time changes”

change, life’s dynamics

MMUSUYIDEE

“that which removes ill luck”

good fortune, sanctity

MPATAPO

“knot of reconciliation”

peacemaking, reconciliation

MPUANNUM

“five tufts” (of hair)

priestly office, loyalty, adroitness

NEA ONNIM NO SUA A, OHU

“he who does not know can know from learning”

knowledge, life-long education

NEA OPE SE OBEDI HENE

“he who wants to be king”

service, leadership

NKONSONKONSON

“chain links”

unity, human relations

NYAME DUA

“tree of god”

God’s protection and presence

NKYIMU

the crossed divisions made on adinkra cloth before printing

skillfulness, precision

NKYINKYIM

“twistings”

initiative, dynamism, versatility

NSAA

type of hand-woven cloth

excellence, genuineness, authenticity

NSOROMMA

“child of the heavens”

guardianship

NYAME BIRIBI

WO SORO

“God is in the heavens”

hope

NYAME NNWU

NA MAWU

“God never dies, therefore I cannot die”

life after death

NYAME NTI

“by God’s grace”

faith & trust in God

NYAME YE OHENE

“God is King”

majesty and supremacy of God

NYANSAPO

“wisdom knot”

wisdom, ingenuity, intelligence and patience

ODO NNYEW

FIE KWAN

“love never loses its way home”

power of love

OKODEE MMOWERE

“talons of the eagle”

bravery, strength

ONYANKOPON ADOM NTI BIRIBIARA BEYE YIE

“By God’s grace, all will be well”

hope, providence, faith

OSRAM NE NSOROMMA

“the moon and the star”

love, faithfulness, harmony

OWO FORO ADOBE

“snake climbing the raffia tree”

steadfastness, prudence, diligence

OWUO ATWEDEE

“the ladder of death”

mortality

PEMPAMSIE

“sew in readiness”

readiness, steadfastness

SANKOFA

“return and get it”

learn from the past

SANKOFA

(alternate version)

SESA WO SUBAN

“I change or transform my life”

transformation

TAMFO BEBRE

“the enemy will stew in his own juice”

jealousy

WAWA ABA

“seed of the wawa tree”

hardiness, toughness, perseverance

WOFORO DUA PA A

“when you climb a good tree”

support, cooperation

WO NSA DA MU A

“if your hands are in the dish”

democracy, pluralism

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Church Choir & Clergy Kente Stoles

It is common to see church choirs and clergy wearing kente stoles.  Below is an example of a kente stole for choir and clergy that we carry.

Christian Kente Stole

If you are interested in purchasing this kente stole please click on the image above.

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Other African Fabrics and Textiles

Besides Kente Cloth, there are various other types of African Frabrics and Textiles.  These cloths are generally hand made and require a lot of patience and creativity. Below are some other creative and beautiful types of fabric from Africa you will love:

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Kente Cloth Weave Patterns & Meaning

Below are the Kente Cloth Weave Patterns that you may find on Kente Cloths. These are different from Adinkra symbols which also carry their own symbolism.

OBI
NKYE OBI KWAN MU
SI – TO ERR IS HUMAN

obinkye1.jpg (32296  bytes)

Symbol of
FORGIVENESS, CONCILIATION, TOLERANCE, PATIENCE, and FAIRNESS

From the maxim: Obi nkye obi
kwan mu si.

Literal translation: Sooner
or later one would stray into the path of the other.

To err is human, and therefore, one
should be conciliatory
when one is offended. For sooner or later one may be the offender to
the other.


OYOKOMAN
NA GYA DA MU – CRISIS IN THE OYOKO NATION

oyoko.jpg (33641 bytes)

Symbol of
INTERNAL
CONFLICTS, WARNING AGAINST INTERNAL STRIFE, NEED FOR UNITY IN
DIVERSITY, and
RECONCILIATION

This cloth name commemorates the
civil war after the death
of Osei Tutu between two factions of the Oyoko royal family. One
faction was headed by
Opoku Ware and the other by Dako.


SIKA
FRE MOGYA –
MONEY ATTRACTS  BLOOD RELATIONS

Sikafre.jpg (15690 bytes)

Symbol of FAMILY RELATIONS, RESPONSIBILITY, HARD WORK, and SHARING

From the proverb:   Sika
fre mogya.

Literal translation: Money
attracts blood relations. Or, Wealth

strengthens the family bonds.

When one succeeds, one has
responsibility to share one’s
success with one’s relatives.

In the Akan extended family system,
the attraction of
financial success to blood relations can sometimes be overwhelming.


AWIA REPUE –
RISING SUN

wiarepue.jpg (20795 bytes)

Symbol of PROGRESS, RENEWAL, DEVELOPMENT, WARMTH, VITALITY, and ENERGY

This symbol was used by the Progress
Party that ruled Ghana
from 1969 to 1972 as its party logo.


NSOROMMA  –
STARS

Symbol of
DEPENDENCY
ON GOD, HOPE, HIGH EXPECTATION, and POWER OF THE PEOPLE

From the maxim: Nyankonsoromma
na oman wo no na nnye osrane. Or, Oba
nyankonsoromma me te Nyame so na mennte me ho so.

Literal translation: The
state belongs to the people and not to the king. The
stars represent the
people and are contrasted with the moon (osrane), representing the
king. The people are
always there though kings may come and go.

The second statement translates thus: Like
the star son of
God, I depend on God not on myself.

This cloth is an example of kente
fufuo (“white” kente) in the Akan color scheme. The other color
classifications are kookoo and tuntum.


ACHIMOTA
NSAFOA – ACHIMOTA KEYS

achimota.jpg (9799 bytes)

Symbol of KNOWLEDGE, UNITY IN DIVERSITY, and HARMONY

The motif commemorates the Achimota
School and College
which was opened in 1927. The motif represents the logo of Achimota –
the black and white
keys of the piano.  One can make  melody on either the
black or white keys of
the piano, but one can make harmony by playing together both the
black and white keys of
the piano.

Achimota, which at one time or the
other comprised primary,
secondary and university programs, was very much influenced by the
Phelp-Stokes Report on
Education in Africa and the programs at the
Hampton and Tuskegee Institutes in the US.


AKOKOBAATAN
– MOTHER HEN

Akokotan.jpg (12266 bytes)

Symbol of MOTHERLINESS, PARENTAL CARE, PARENTAL DISCIPLINE, and TENDERNESS

From the proverbs:  Akoko
baatan tia ne ba so a, onku no. Also, Akoko baatan na onim dea ne
mma bedi.

Literal translation: When the
hen steps on the feet of her chicken, she does not mean to kill them.
That
is, parental admonition is not intended to harm the child, but to
correct the child.

Also, The
good mother knows
what her children will eat. A good mother does not
only feed her children
food alone, she also feeds them with love, affection, warmth,
tenderness and care.


APREMO –
CANON

apremo.jpg (16912 bytes)

Symbol of RESISTANCE AGAINST FOREIGN DOMINATION, SUPERIOR MILITARY STRATEGY

This motif represents  the
superior military strategy
with which Akan nations such as the Asante and Akwamu defeated the
Europeans who had
superior arms. An Asantehene is said to have remarked: “The white
man brought his
canon to the bush but the bush was stronger than the canon.”


BABADUA

babadua.jpg (9672 bytes)

Symbol of STRENGTH,

TOUGHNESS, RESILIENCY, POWER and SUPERIORITY

The babadua tree was used for
building fences and thatch roof frames.

In the past, before an asafo (the
militia) went to war, it is said that a pile of babadua would be
placed on top of a dug-out and a number of the asafo members
stood on the pile. If the pile did not break, that signified that
they had enough fighting
men. Babadua was used in constructing
barricades during war,
because it was particularly strong and resilient. It was also used
in house construction.

The use of this motif at the edge of
the woven cloth gives
tensile strength to the cloth and prevents unraveling or fraying.
This is a technical
innovation in Akan weaving.


AKYEM –
SHIELD

Ekyem.jpg (21741 bytes)

Symbol of BRAVERY

AND HEROIC DEEDS, GLORIOUS ACCOMPLISHMENT

From the proverb: Akyem tete a
eka ne mmeramu.

Literal translation: When a
shield wears out, the framework still remains.

The good deeds of people live after them.


FA HIA
KOTWERE AGYEMAN – LEAN
YOUR POVERTY ON AGYEMAN

Fahiako.jpg (11164 bytes)

Some people have interpreted the
meaning of this motif in
such manner suggesting that there was a particular Asantehene (King
of the Asante Empire)
called Agyeman who was so benevolent that he took care of the poor.
Agyeman is an
appellation of every Asantehene, and benevolence is socially
expected of every Asantehene
Hence, the benevolence of the king is also indicated by the
expression esen
kese a ogye adidi dodoo – the big pot that feeds many.

This motif rather represents the rise
of the bureaucracy in
Asante in the 19th century.  Several men chose to serve in the
king’s court rather
than stay poor as village farmers. Very soon some of these
bureaucrats in the king’s court
became rich to the extent that some were vying for stool positions.

There is another kente cloth called wonya
wo ho
a, wonye dehyee – you
may be rich, but you are not a royal, which
puts these pretenders to the stool in their proper place.


NANKA TIRE
– PUFF ADDER’S HEAD

nankatre.jpg (12953 bytes)

Symbol

of EXPLOITATION, BEING OVER-BURDENED WITH WORK

From the proverb:  Meso
annini mentumi a, wose menkofa nanka tire mmo kahyire.

Literal translation: I cannot
even carry the python, yet you are asking me to use the puff adder’s
head as the carrying
pad.


KYEMFERE –
POTSHERD

Kyemfre1.jpg (16253 bytes)

Symbol of EXPERIENCE, KNOWLEDGE, SERVICE, ANTIQUITY, TIME, HEIRLOOM, and
RARITY

From the proverb: Kyemfere se
odaa ho akye, na onipa a onwene no nso nye den?

Literal translation: The
potsherd claims it has been around from time immemorial; what about
the potter who molded
it?

G. F. Kojo Arthur and Robert Rowe – 1998-2001

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Kente Cloths

Kente Cloth is a hand-woven in Ghana and is traditionally worn by people of royalty due to its cost and complexity.  See Kente Cloth for additional information.

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